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By David Goodsell

Creative Magic has always had a different mindset than most magic manufacturers. Their products are unusual and their marketing is unique. So when Brian and Rebekah South decided to leave that business, of course they came up with a creative exit strategy.

 

 




By Adele Friel Rhindress

Adele had never heard of the magician before, yet an agent convinced the teenage dancer to apply for a role in The Great Blackstone’s show. From that very day in 1947, she began touring with the show of 1001 Wonders.

 

 

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By Mark Nelson

He admits that he performs no magic “that’s under a hundred years old.” But Farrell Dillon has added his own touch to the classic manipulation act, and he produces something unusual with it — laughter.

 

 

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By Dale Salwak

It was a show created to both entertain and unite the people of North Korea. The monumental Grand Magic production was mounted in a 150,000-seat stadium earlier this year, with massive illusions playing out before — and above — the crowds.

 

 

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By Richard Hatch

French magician Claude Rix was awarded multiple prizes in FISM competitions in the 1950s and ’60s. He performed illusions for years, but is best known for his close-up routines. Claude still performs and lectures, and here provides two routines from his close-up repertoire.

 

 

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The International Magic Experience (IMX) took place at The Orleans Hotel in Las Vegas, May 23–25. This was the premiere convention for South African producer Craig Mitchell, and the reported attendance was over 400 for this lecture-driven event.

 

 

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An exhibition focusing on the career of David Copperfield is currently on display at the Musée de la Magie in Paris, France. French writer Benoit Grenier, who previously authored a biography of Copperfield and worked on the museum project, says “The exhibition shows various aspects of David’s life and career; it features programs, posters, memorabilia, previously unseen photos, and original costumes and props.”

 

 

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The Magic Collectors Weekend, under the auspices David Ben’s Magicana for the second year in a row, transpired at the Westin Hotel in Chicago, May 19–21. It was the 42nd such convening of scholarly talks and learned fellowship.

 

 

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Guy Hollingworth brings his one-man show, The Expert at the Card Table, to Southern California for a month-long run; and a trio of singing magicians — Desimo, Helge Thun, and Topas — perform Sing Sala Bim.

 

 

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Fourteen products are reviewed this month by Peter Duffie, Jason England, Gabe Fajuri, Brad Henderson, John Lovick, Francis Menotti, and Will Houstoun:

The Berglas Effects by Richard Kaufman
The Lost Symbol by Max Gordon
Shoe Business by Scott Alexander & Puck
Deception Vol.1 by Dave Forrest
Newsflash 2.0 Universal by Axel Heckau
The Complete Jarrett by Jim Steinmeyer
Handcrafted Card Magic Vol. 2 by Denis Behr
Cagliostro’s Wand by Allen Zingg & Blaine Harris
The Open Prediction Project by Tom Baxter
Kings Crossing by Nicolas Gignac
Psi-Poker by Ben Harris
Crafty Power by Kreis & I-Magic
TeleThought Wallet II by Chris Kenworthy & Tony Curtis
Sandwiches by Tony Chang

 

 




John Lovick delivers a complex but powerful card routine suitable for large audiences. Curtis Kam offers a fruit production that could be the opener to your next close-up engagement. “Talk About Tricks” newcomers Ollie Meaning and Jonathan Davidson bring us some card ideas, and Jeff Prace returns with an Expertalk on Tilt.

 

 




J.B. Hargett to Adelaide Herrmann
The letter that is the focal point of this article is a bit of a departure from items featured here previously, in as much as the writer, J.B. Hargett, was not a magician. He was an expert at chirognomy — the art of character reading based on the shape and features of the hand. Upon hearing the news of Alexander Herrmann’s death, Hargett immediately contacted Adelaide and requested permission to make an inked impression of her husband’s hand. Perhaps sensing that this slightly creepy procedure would ensure her husband’s place among the most famous names of the time, she acquiesced.

 

 

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Stain Alive
After making a prediction on a napkin, you spill a few drops of coffee on the table and soak it up with a napkin. An irregular-shaped stain emerges through the napkin, which looks like Rorschach inkblot. Someone describes what the coffee stain looks like — a bat or a butterfly or a break-dancing amoeba, maybe. You turn over the prediction-napkin to show the inked outline of a shape that accurately matches the randomly formed coffee stain.

 

 

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Oh, My Wild-Eyed Pie in the Sky
People tell me their wild-eyed, pie-in-the-sky ideas all the time.
“I’m thinking of having a horn surgically implanted in my forehead.”
“Hmmm, kind of a unicorn routine?”
“Yeah. Maybe a Card Stab or something.”
“Interesting.”
“People would remember me.”
“Yeah. Maybe.”
Everyone thinks their wild-eyed, pie-in-the-sky idea is great — if only they had the money and the resources. But there have been lots of shows with wild-eyed, pie-in-the-sky promises that spent plenty of money to get nowhere.

 

 

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It Takes A Team
In March 2011, Stephane Vanel had an opportunity to showcase at the Paris Hotel. They decided to give him a chance, and the show was set to open June 1. Stephane had two months to put together an hour-long show. That sounds like a lot of time, but it was a real challenge.

 

 

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MAGIC, The Magazine For Magicians (ISSN 1062-2845) is published monthly for $54 per year by Stagewrite Publishing, Inc., 6220 Stevenson Way, Las Vegas, NV 89120 USA. Periodical Postage Paid at Las Vegas, NV, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MAGIC - Attn: Circulation Dept., 6220 Stevenson Way, Las Vegas, NV 89120 USA
© 2011 MAGIC Magazine [click to return to cover page]